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Free Cook Pots with Sun Oven!

5b0f552c-f58e-4fc3-bea1-5f4391255fb7.jpgThrough October 31, 2016, a set of two Easy Stack Pots w/interchangeable enamel and a glass lids is being provided FREE with the purchase of an All American SUN OVEN (you MUST mention this with each order you place).

The remaining items in the Dehydrating and Preparedness Accessory Package can be purchased for an additional $35.70 when purchased with a All American SUN OVEN.package2012

The Cook Pot set or Dehydrating and Preparedness Package can be shipped inside the All American SUN OVEN without increasing the cost of shipping.

To purchase, simply write me an email at jean7eisenhower@gmail.com, and I’ll send you a PayPal invoice which you can pay with any credit or debit card – and no fee.

Since shipping is included in the price, the Sun Oven (with free cook pots) is $299, plus tax if you’re in Arizona.  The Sun Oven with the full Dehydrating and Preparedness Package is 334.70, plus tax if you’re in Arizona.  (New Mexico friends won’t pay tax anymore, now that I’m living and doing business in Arizona.)

When I place an order, customers usually see their oven delivered within a week!

Since I was traveling, I didn’t announce this immediately, so act fast – only til 2 pm on the 31st!

(Cooked steak and rice yesterday in my oven.  Wonderful!!)

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Last Weeks for the Summer Sun Oven Special

package2012This Special will be good until September 22 (about 2 pm – and if you’re pushing the deadline, please call me at 575-519-2320, so I don’t miss it!):

Pay only $33.35 for each Dehydrating and Preparedness Accessory Package when ordered with a SUN OVEN :

* Multi-Level Dehydrating & Baking Rack Set (set of 3 racks w/1 roll parchment paper)

* Two Easy Stack Pots w/interchangeable enamel and glass lids (I consider these essential, and they cost $24 separately)

* Multi-Fuel Water Pasteurizing Indicator (WAPI) (an essential survival item, usually $9 each)

* Two Loaf Pans

* Computer CD featuring 600 recipes, videos and much more

A Sun Oven is $299, the lowest price they allow, and the package parts, if purchased separately, cost about $75.  The stacking cook pots are the best for all-around cooking, roasting, baking, and stewing.  The WAPI is a potential life-saver.  I use my bread pans regularly too.  And I want to use my dehydrating and baking rack set more often.  The total cost of $33.35 is less than the cook pots and WAPI – almost essential items – so the other items are essentially free.  A very nice package.

The total plus AZ tax is $352.62.
Ordering from other states, without added tax, is $332.35.

To order, call me at 575-519-2320, or email jean7eisenhower@gmail.com.  You can either get me a check or cash, or I’ll send you a PayPal invoice, which you can pay with either PayPal or a credit or debit card.

(One day soon, I hope to have a new site with payment option imbedded.  Meantime, we get to be old-fashioned and actually talk on the phone if we want, or email.  Thanks for your patience!)

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Webinar tomorrow! Three great reasons….

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Hi Everyone!

I hope everyone will register for our (free!) online webinar tomorrow, on the 9th of June – even if you don’t think you can attend on the 9th, because if you register, you can watch the webinar free for a few weeks afterward.

It’ll also make you eligible for a special (a $164 savings) unlike any available throughout the year to non-registrants.

As of last week, we had 17 registrants, and I hope you all will not miss this.  Here’s the link to register:

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/home-and-garden-inspiration-sun-cooking-essentials-class-tickets-25210697876

When I previewed it last week, I was surprised that, even though I’ve been cooking with the sun since 1988, I learned a lot, and definitely got inspired, even though I thought I was already inspired about solar cooking!

It’s been a long time since I did my own Sun Oven demonstration – so when Paul Munsen, the smilin’ guy walking beside Nelson Mandela (above), suggested I do a webinar with him – actually, he teaches, and I invite guests and play host – all online – I said yes and was delighted by how much I learned in the preview.

Paul says people are enjoying the webinars so much, they have become the source of 30% of their growing sales now …not that we expect everyone to buy, because even if you already own one, we want you to join the online class, watch Paul’s videos, ask questions, and get answers from someone who’s delivered Sun Ovens, “the Cadillac of solar ovens,” to 128 countries around the world where they are part of slowing down deforestation and lung problems for women who cook over fire in little huts. So, he’s a good guy. (Here in the US too, solar cooking saves money and deforestation.)

There’s NO COST, it’s fun, and you can sign up and not attend if you change your mind! But I think you’ll enjoy it. You can also invite friends from around the country. Thursday, June 9, 6:30 pm. More details below!

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/home-and-garden-inspiration-sun-cooking-essentials-class-tickets-25210697876

Hope to see you there!

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Register!

SO-logo8-15.pngHi Everyone!

I just pre-viewed our online webinar (free!) coming up on the 9th of June – and was surprised that, even though I’ve been cooking with the sun since 1988, I learned a lot, and definitely got inspired, even though I thought I was already inspired about solar cooking!

Even if you don’t think you can attend on the 9th, if you register, you can watch the webinar free for a few weeks afterward.

It’ll make you eligible for a special (a $164 savings) unlike any available throughout the year to non-registrants.

Only a few folks have signed up so far, so please give us some encouragement, and register now!  Thanks!

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/home-and-garden-inspiration-sun-cooking-essentials-class-tickets-25210697876

See you there!

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Free solar cooking webinar

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 2.18.22 PMIt’s been a long time since I did a Sun Oven demonstration – but Paul Munsen, the smilin’ guy walking beside Nelson Mandela, talked me into doing a webinar with him – actually, he teaches, and I invite guests and play host – all online.

He says that people are enjoying them so much, that these webinars have become the source of 30% of their growing sales now ..not that you will feel any pressure to buy, and even if you already own one, you’re welcome to join the online class, watch Paul’s videos, ask questions, and get answers from someone who’s delivered Sun Ovens (“the Cadillac of solar ovens”) to 128 countries around the world where they are part of slowing down deforestation and lung problems for women who cook over fire in little huts. So, he’s a good guy. (Here in the US too, solar cooking saves money and deforestation.)

There’s NO COST, it’s fun, and you can sign up and not attend if you change your mind! But I think you’ll enjoy it. You can also invite friends from around the country. Thursday, June 9, 6:30 pm. More details below!

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Plan to Purge, Create a Flow, and Hold the Moose Turd Ornaments, Please

You must have guessed by the title that I wrote Fireplace A.JPGthis for the holidays.  It was published weeks ago in the Silver City Independent, and I’m finally getting around to posting it because it has some good advice, regardless of the date.

“A home should serve the people, not the other way around.”

We might quibble a bit about this statement, but when I first read it in 1978, a chorus inside me jumped up to shout: Right on!!

I guess the service I’ve given over my lifetime to keeping a home as pristine as possible has left me with a few negative associations, so I’ve remembered this counsel fondly.  And I use it sometimes to remind myself that I am not on this planet to serve a building.  Instead, the primary task of a home maker is to design the home to serve the needs of the people who live there.

What are our needs, besides the obvious shelter, warmth, and food?  For some it’s family relations.  For others it’s quiet and privacy.  For some it’s social space.  Set your priorities, review them now and then, and notice where habit and convention might not serve you.

One of the biggest hurdles to American home function is orderliness, and one of the biggest problems with orderliness is our national propensity for buying so many unnecessary things.

th.jpgThe best example I’ve ever seen, maybe a decade or more ago, were moose turds with red bows attached, slid into tiny cardboard displays inside glossy, cellophane-fronted Christmas gift boxes.  Curmudgeon that I can be, I wondered how many kilowatts of electricity, gallons of fuel, and other environmental costs were incurred – but more important, how many hours did people suffer at jobs they hated and missed being home with their loved ones – so that other people in a silly giving frenzy could all have a boisterous laugh on the same holy day.  Then, weeks later, someone felt bad, or maybe not, for throwing the package – and the turd, maybe a thousand miles from home – finally into the trash.

As a nation in trouble, we need to check our impulses and buy less unnecessary stuff, so we can all have time (and money) for the simpler, more beautiful, and heart-felt things.

After slowing the flow of crap (literally, as in my example), to create a home that serves us, it’s critical to design a flow for everything that needs to flow out.

How often have you heard friends exclaim about how great they feel for getting rid of extra stuff?  I’ve been that person a few times this decade; at last three friends this year have gushed to me about the wonderfulness, even healing experience, of their recent home “purging.”  Experts say we should do it every year.

When?  Well, some time about now would be perfect.  Most of us are experiencing some form of our national giving ritual, and for months we’ve been hearing, and it’s still ringing in us somewhere:  open your hearts and wallets to the less fortunate.  Some of us have done that; some of us do it all year long.  Some of us mean to, but don’t do it as much as we might.

At the very least, we can respond with our excess stuff In America, we have plenty of it, though unequally distributed.  Many of us can open our closets and cabinets, and see a lot that is only clutter to us, but might make a difference in another person’s life.  The task:  put it in a box and don’t look at it again, except with a blessing that the items find the next home where they’ll be better used.  Do this from room to room.

Consider also all the things you don’t use because they need repair.  Gather them up, or put them on a list, and make a plan for every single item: repair or give away to someone else who can repair.  There are lots of places to give things.  Ask around.

But let’s not stop with a single purge!  Let’s plan to make it a lifestyle!  Let’s design a flow system to deal with the items we’ll recognize next week, next month.

How to keep the excess moving?  We might not be able to take everything where it needs to go immediately, so we need a designated place for outflow.

In my small home, I keep a chair near the front door that collects things to go out – and there’s something on it almost every day, ready to drop off at the thrift store.  A suitcase in the closet collects things I’ll pass on to family and friends on my next trip out of state.

Scrap building materials aren’t exactly clutter, but they might not flow into use for a while.  I didn’t want them in the way, or to get weather damaged, or to create skunk habitat, so it was a priority to build outdoor storage space.  Not fun on a day that might have been lazy, but oh so satisfying over the years.  My materials, continuing to expand, were protected and out of sight, and one day became parts of a chicken coop, a built-in bed frame in my studio, shelves in the sunroom, and framework for some of my natural plaster sculpture.  And every tiny left-over scrap went into the wood pile and eventually into my fireplace – a flow that serves me, no clutter, no waste, no contribution to landfill space!

A lot of things flow through our lives today, and it’s important that we be grateful for them (easier to do when we have less).  And when it’s time for those things to flow out, let’s do it properly, not gum up the works, not mar our aesthetics, and not waste our time and money.

This winter season, I wish you all good things:  a home with warmth, good food, friendly connections, time to relax, not too much junk – in other words, a space that serves you.

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Save 35% on the most popular Accessory Package

package2012.jpgBy popular demand, Sun Oven is once again offering the Dehydrating & Preparedness Accessory Package (this is the best selling package they have ever offered) at a 35% discount when purchased with the All American SUN OVEN.

The Dehydrating & Preparedness Accessory Package is on sale for $36 with the purchase of the All American SUN OVEN, ordered through February 29, 2016.

 The Dehydrating & Preparedness Accessory Package includes:

  • Multi-Level Dehydrating & Baking Rack Set (set of 3 racks w/1 roll parchment paper)
  • Two Easy Stack Pots w/interchangeable enamel and glass lids [my all-time favorite accessory, which usually costs $25 alone – je]
  • One Multi-Fuel Water Pasteurizing Indicator (WAPI) [essential survival tool]
  • Two Loaf Pans
  • SUN OVEN eCookbook & Emergency Preparedness CD featuring 600 recipes, hundreds of pictures, video clips and much more which has been developed by Cook’n, the award winning and #1 best-selling recipe organizer

To purchase, click here.

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Last few days to buy the Holiday Special

7a431be7-2d2b-4c34-a1d6-1a426f9fd456.jpgHi Friends ~

The Holiday Special will be over this coming Monday, January 11 at 2 pm MDT.

The special allows you to get an accessory package with stacking cook pots, 2 bread pans, a WAPI, a CD of recipes, and a turkey roasting rack – all for $35 with the purchase of a Sun Oven.

The next day begins a new special – for $1 more, you get all the same special items except the turkey rack.   SO, you might want to consider a purchase in the next few days.  Details on the current special is here:

https://homeandgardeninspiration.net/2015/09/03/holiday-sun-oven-special/

Details on the next special follows:

The Dehydrating & Preparedness Accessory Package is on sale for $36 with the purchase of the All American SUN OVEN, ordered through February 29, 2016.

Dehydrating & Preparedness Accessory Package includes:

  • Multi-Level Dehydrating & Baking Rack Set (set of 3 racks w/1 roll parchment paper)
  • Two Easy Stack Pots w/interchangeable enamel and glass lids
  • One Multi-Fuel Water Pasteurizing Indicator (WAPI)
  • Two Loaf Pans
  • SUN OVEN eCookbook & Emergency Preparedness CD featuring 600 recipes, hundreds of pictures, video clips and much more which has been developed by Cook’n. the award winning and #1 best-selling recipe organizer

3fa0dfdb-da00-4f01-9302-4564b72e35c8.jpg

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The Garden and the Medicine Cabinet

herbs hangingWhat do a garden and a medicine cabinet have in common?  Herbs, of course!

Is it realistic for a homemaker to actually provide medicine to the household from the garden without a lot of trouble, mess, education, and maybe even danger?  I think not.  Let’s talk about it.

Let’s start with danger.  Nearly everyone agrees, including medical researchers, that pharmaceuticals, used properly and improperly, contribute to one of the largest causes of death in the United States.  Herbal remedies, on the other hand, have been working very well for thousands of years.  Herbalist Monica Rude of Desert Women Botanicals explains that pharmaceuticals are pathology-oriented, whereas herbs are used more to promote health and support the body’s natural ability to heal itself.  There’s always room for caution, of course, whether using manufactured or natural medicines, so some education is required whichever route your choose.

Harvesting herbs from your yard and making pure medicine in the kitchen can be a satisfying, cost-saving, and health-improving step.

Will it require a lot of effort?  Herbalist Naava Kronenberg, of Bear Creek Herbs, told me last year that she first decided to grow herbs long ago after her vegetable gardening attempts in the desert had been discouraging.  “Herbs are easy,” someone had told her, and she said she discovered that was true.

Herbs are often easy because they create their own pest-control with natural chemicals that also help protect us against our pests – bacteria, viruses, mold, etc.  Herbs also tend to be drought-tolerant or thrive in a dry environment.

Best, many herbs are perennial, meaning you’ll put them in the ground one year and enjoy them for many years to come, a permanent part of your landscaping, requiring very little work.

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Garden-grown herbs turned into tinctures, ready to make into lotions, salves, toothpaste, mouthwash, cleaners, etc!

Will I have to learn a lot?  This depends on how much you want to know.  To learn what you need about a single herb might take twenty minutes to compare a few different sources.  Herb stores and thrift stores have books on the subject, and lots of information can also be found free online, of course.  And many herbalists like Monica offer classes on how to dry and process herbs and then make tinctures.  If you take one herb at a time, you can learn a lot over the course of your life, little by little.

Herbs that grow easily in Southwest gardens are often also quite beautiful – so easy and beautiful you’ll wonder why you didn’t plan to grow and use them long before now.  And they also will provide you flowers throughout much of the year.  Just remember to educate yourself on specific medicinal uses beyond this very brief introduction.

Below are some obvious favorites for the Southwest and a few of their uses to inspire you:

Lavender – one of the most useful, all-around herbs.  Besides smelling lovely, it can be used in salves and tinctures to clear infections, and has many other uses including relaxation and anti-inflammation.

Catnip – for a relaxing tea to prepare for sleep.

Mint – for stomach ache or indigestion.

Rosemary – stimulates circulation and eases nerves.

Mugwort – strengthens digestion and the nervous system.

Lemon balm – calming stress relief.

Echinacea – combats flu and colds.

Holy Basil – for stress and anxiety.

Motherwort – heart calming.

Yarrow – heals wounds, stops bleeding, reduces fevers.  It grows best in “poor soil” with lots of light – perfect in the Southwest!

Hyssop – gargle for sore throats and viral infections.

Comfrey – anti-inflammatory, and for skin wounds.

Yerba mansa – for colds and other infections.  Will only grow “with its feet wet,” so I have mine in its original black bucket, sitting in the basin of a fountain.

herbs hanging
Hang herbs to dry in the shade with good ventilation till crispy, then place into clean jars for storage or prepare right away.

Oregano – for infections and general tonic.

All these plants can give you multiple benefits (green, flowers, medicine, food for bees, etc.) for very little work on your part – the lazy gardener’s dream!  Just take it little by little, one plant, one medicine at a time.

What medicinal herbs do you find easy and useful to grow in your garden?

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Plan to Prune!

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The bumper crop of almonds is ready to be harvested! This is a branch earlier this year (see those in the shade by my hand too?). Now they’re yellowed and splitting open – time to harvest!

Today was the first day I went outside in the morning and almost needed a sweater!  

As I reflect on the changing of seasons, I must share our greatest success and lesson:  Prune!!  Everything we pruned last fall gave us bumper crops this summer. 

It’s embarrassing to admit my gardening ignorance (not yard design ignorance though!), but I will, because so many people say the same thing as I used to:  it’s hard to cut off healthy plant life!  (Actually, I still say that, but I do it.)

I used to think, “Plants in nature don’t need to be pruned, and since I imitate Nature, I don’t need to prune.”

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Even though these are dwarf peach trees and didn’t need much pruning, they still responded positively with a double-sized crop.

The error is in the phrase “plants in nature.”  The truth is that very few of our garden/yard plants are actually wild and natural.  Many have been genetically selected for traits such as hardiness, which can make a plant grow too vigorously for it’s own good – unless it’s pruned.  And even Nature does a fair amount of pruning, through windstorms, for instance, which we try to curtail with fences and plantings against walls for their protection.

So, attend a pruning class, or go online.  Clean and sharpen your tools, or buy or borrow the correct ones.  Then set aside a day, maybe invite some friends over to help and learn, maybe work at their house next, and get it done!

HUGE apricots!
HUGE apricots!

Fall, after leaves have actually fallen, is the generally-accepted best time, so it’s not too soon to start gearing up.  But if it’s too busy a time for you, other seasons have benefits too.  Look it up.

You might also read about planting cuttings to generate new plants instead of throwing those branches away.  Also, you might save a few large branches for natural stakes next year – and other uses.

Have fun out there!  Enjoy the cooling weather.

Twice the cherries on our little tree too!
Twice the cherries on our little tree too!
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Sphinx Moth Caterpillars on Grapes…and into Chickens…maybe

DSC05507Achemon sphinx caterpillars (Eumorpha achemon) are huge, up to 3 1/2″ long and can eat up to 9 grape leaves a day, according to  http://homeguides.sfgate.com/caterpillars-large-feed-grape-vines-54980.html.

Finding four, so far, on my vines, I realized:  thirty-six leaves a day…that would equal hundreds of leaves gone if left to browse for a week!

The site above advocates handpicking the caterpillars and dropping them in a bucket of soapy water, but of course, I thought I’d rather feed them to my chickens.

However, when I dropped the three I could find (Where did the fourth go?) into the chicken coop, the chickens backed away as if in horror.

DSC05518It’s not that they don’t like living things, as I’ve given them live mice, grasshoppers, and roaches, for which they go into a feeding frenzy.

But these they backed away from when they just wiggled.  Perhaps they were only unfamiliar?

I cut up the caterpillars with kitchen shears, and inside they oozed with green grape leaves half-digested – good food for the chickens, I thought.

When the chickens came close again, they still jumped away at the first wiggle of a caterpillar section!

DSC05495Below is a close-up of the Sphinx Moth Caterpillar – quite beautiful, I think, and so it was difficult to pick them, knowing I was sending them to their deaths, and again when I chose to cut them up.  But I’m sure they’ve laid plenty of eggs, and I’ll see their progeny next year.  Life will go on.

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Meanwhile, back in the coop, the bravest old bird picked up a piece and the others followed her to watch.  It seems she ate it.  And soon the three were gathered ’round, considering….

A half-hour later, the caterpillar parts were gone.

Now, back to find the fourth one, and look for more.

See you next year, beautiful Sphinx Moth~


eumoache

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Big Lizard, Beautiful Yarrow, Solar Cooking, Solar Tea, First Sunflower

Well, now I know what my cat has been so interested in around the pond!IMG_3641

When I found this, at first I thought it was a snake skin – until I saw the legs!

I love lizards and love to create habitat for them (lots of rocks) – which also means discouraging my cat from catching them, which I seem to have accomplished.

There is so much that’s beautiful in the garden these days, but one of my favorites has been the tansy.IMG_3615

I’ve been watching the flower buds change from nearly-white to pale orange, to darker orange, and deep salmon.

The very first medicinal herb I recall learning about – back in Louisville, Kentucky, in the late 70s, I believe – was the tansy.  I bought a tiny amount and, silly me, kept it in a jar as if it were gold to be saved for … I forget.  I probably threw it away after keeping it for ten years!!  Now, I learn that it has fallen out of favor with modern herbalists, not good for as many things as it used to be reputed to cure.  For now, I’ll just enjoy enjoy its beauty.

IMG_3732_2The first sunflower, in the early morning light, eight-nine feet tall!

Below:  solar cooking an apricot cobbler, made from gift apricots!  See Peaches hanging out beneath?

And, as always, making a few solar teas:  mineral tea from our local herbalist, peppermint tea from the garden, and lemon …. [verbena? – no, it was something else I can’t remember!… will fill in soon] gift from a friend also.

(I thought I was sacrificing valuable garden space to something less useful and valuable than vegetables, when I decided the garden and my erratic energy would best be spent on herbs, but now I’m realizing that the herbs I produce here, a dozen or more, are highly useful, and valuable, probably of more value than the few tomatoes I used to work SO hard for.  I’m delighted now to focus just on herbs.)

Blessings in your garden!  Make it a healing place for you, your spirit, your loved ones, friends, wild things, pet things, and the planet.IMG_3733

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First Annual “Summer Solstice Solar Cooking Celebration” in Silver City!

11062766_1716424818584877_1805128252039007996_n
The outdoor Silver City Art Market is an important adjunct to the Farmers Market and other events in downtown Silver City on Saturdays from May through October. Find them on Bullard Street, across from the Farmers Market, between 7th and 8th Streets. Their website is http://silvercityartmarket.com/, and you can also find them (and “Like” them) on Facebook.

I’m super excited to team up with the outdoor Silver City Art Market in downtown Silver City to host the First Annual “Summer Solstice Solar Cooking Celebration” in Silver City!

Solar cooks are invited to come join with others, bring their ovens to the Art Market parking lot on Saturday, June 20, between 8-9 am to set up and, between 9 and 2, cook, visit, learn, demonstrate, show off your greatest solar dish – and meet new solar cooking friends, all in a relaxed, non-scheduled celebration.

The “solar curious” are invited to come see the variety of both home-built and manufactured solar ovens – as well as the solar cooking skills of people you might not have known were solar cooks, maybe your friends and neighbors!

There’ll also be cookbooks to purchase and printed instructions to take home on how to build your own solar oven – free with a $1 donation or more.

All donations will fund the gift of a free Sun Oven to a Silver City/Grant County non-profit organization involved in food sustainability! 

The event is free and open to the public and will take place at the Silver City Art Market parking lot on Bullard Street between 7th and 8th Streets.  

If you own an oven and would like to cook, please call 575-534-0123 for more information, or leave a comment here, to help us plan – but registration is not required – it’s okay to just show up!  (Please check out my “remember” list below.)

This celebration is co-sponsored by the Silver City Art Market and Home and Garden Inspiration.

See you there!

~

solar cook bAnother notable solar cooking celebration has been happening annually north of Tucson since at least the 1980s, which was probably my first inspiration to get a solar oven and try it for myself.  I did and have been solar cooking since 1988.

I even lived off-the-grid without any other means of cooking for an entire year, 2000-2001 – and I only ate fireplace-heated food once (and it was so much more difficult than cooking with solar)!

This old photo was taken of me in Bisbee, Arizona, in 2004 on the Summer Solstice at a solar cooking celebration there at their Farmers Market.  (I was cooking beets and carrots in brown rice, which all turns that lovely red – a delicious, simple meal, and a family favorite.)

Over the years, I’ve learned I can cook virtually anything in my solar ovens (yes, I’ve always had a few) – baking bread and casseroles, boiling and steaming veggies, cooking grains, and even “sautéing” onions and garlic – all without opening the oven to stir because the heat comes from all around the pan!  Easy!

I hope all my local readers come out to cook or get inspired to cook!  Because solar cooking saves money, it’s fun, it’s educational, and it inspires one to think about passive solar in all its other applications: heating your home, outbuildings, patio, water, compost, chicken coop, doghouse, greenhouse, and more!

And solar ovens can be a serious safety appliance in the event of a loss of power or fuel, as they can pasteurize questionable water, milk, and other liquids with the sun.

Hope to see you there!

~

If you plan to cook at the event, you’ll want to remember (and probably pack the night before, so you can arrive and get set up by 9 am):

* your oven, cookware, utensils, and hot pads

* eating dishes, utensils, and napkins

* towels and water for clean-up

* sunglasses and shade (not too big which might steal sun from a neighbor)

* chairs (extras for friends is always nice), small table

* drinking water and cups

* And in the morning, remember your food, including oils, spices, salt, and pepper, etc.

*** Anything more I might have forgotten?  Tell me so I can update this and better help the next people.

Oh, yes!  And give me a call at 575-534-0123,
or email me at jean7eisenhower@gmail.com,
or post a comment here,
so we can get a probable count and do better planning for you!  Thanks!  

See you there!

Posted in 1 Garden, Uncategorized

Wonderful Week! Son Visit, Fruit Trees, New Panorama, More

20150514_200255What a wonderful week, with my son visiting, appreciating all the changes in the garden, and the unusual and so appreciated rains!

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The apricots are not only there for the first time ever (after its first serious pruning), but they’re big!

Ditto the almonds!

IMG_3052And the grapes are coming on ~

My son took a 360 degree panorama, which is now my website banner.  Thanks, Mike.

We know it’s a good health practice to get out and walk, but I’d been neglecting that lately, which caused my heart to give me a wake-up call.  So I’ve been walking for an hour every morning for the last four weeks, which almost always rewards me with some treat.  Sometimes, it’s dandelions for the chickens from a neighbor’s more abundant sidewalk, and sometimes it’s something phenomenal, like this cactus, overwhelmed by its own flowers.IMG_3039

Finally, last week, Peaches was teaching me how to quit working and just look around and feel the place.  So I did, and I lay back on the cottonwood bench and up into the branches oIMG_3022f the mesquite tree, which I pruned last year – and think the branches are very beautiful.  Everything seems to have appreciated the pruning.  A metaphor for life, I think.

(For the panorama, my son had us move from his beginning point to his end point in the circle while he turned in the opposite direction, placing us at two different points in the photo, for fun.)

Love your garden!

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Posted in 1 Garden, Uncategorized

Pruning Results are Wonderful!

photo 2 copyLast fall, I hosted two workshops on pruning, taught by arborist Cheyenne Thomas – and got lots of professional advice to make my fruit trees healthier, more productive, and easier to manage.

(I’m one of those who has a hard time taking a saw or blade to beautiful living things.) DSC04264

One of our trees was this dwarf peach, which we espaliered next to the fence.

…and baby peaches have formed!
…and baby peaches have formed!

A month or so ago, it was all leafed out and had these tiny peaches. three peaches

Today those three are plumping up!

Even though roses weren’t part of the workshop, I took the effort to learn a little more about pruning them, then did the work – and today we are amazed at the number of blooms we have! roses(And we’ve been picking quite a few for the house already.)rose buds

And there are a cluster of buds ready to burst forth any day. roses ws

What to do with spent roses?  Well, I’ve always lain mine either near the sculpture of Mary or some other pretty place, showing respect.  Since we’ve created the new fountain (using the old broken Mary fountain), I started to lay old roses nearby, then realized they might have more life if put in the fountain water pond!  Of course, they do, and when their petals fall, they are still lovely floating in the water.fountain ms

Hope you’re having as much fun in your garden as we are!